Home > Uncategorized > UK Councils Monthly Social Media Reputation Index – July 2010

UK Councils Monthly Social Media Reputation Index – July 2010

Welcome to July’s Monthly Social Media Reputation Index – powered by CouncilMonitor.

As a quick reminder CouncilMonitor trawls the Internet 24 hours a day, seven days a week, searching through news, blogs, forums and social media sites. It reads through all of this information and summarises what’s being said about UK councils, and assesses whether the sentiment is positive or negative.

On a monthly basis we monitor and report on a number of metrics, as well as discussing current #socialmedia issues and observations.

This month we’ve revised the monthly snapshot of Councils in each category (District, Unitary, County).  Whereas previously we listed the top 5 in each category by volume, this month we have aggregated them all and listed the top and bottom 20 by sentiment – subject to them attaining a minimum number of references during the month.  (Districts = 100 mentions, Counties and Unitaries = 300)

The top 20 UK Councils are:

Top 20 councils

The bottom 20 are:

bottom 20 councils

So what’s going on in the highest scoring councils then? Being just down the road from us we thought we’d have a look at Leicestershire.  The dashboard below shows the overall activity levels, the sources of references, the breakdown of media etc.

Leics County Council July 2010

Leics County Council July 2010

Drilling through the data there are a good mix of subjects – ranging from recycling centre workers rescuing kittens to the Library service launching a new guide to trace family’s war history!

In our control group (see previous blog entries for make up), one of the headline metrics we have been measuring is the mix of media sources referring to any of the 400+ UK councils. Last month we discussed the significant jump in ‘News’ sources as a result of some of the News media syndicating their content across multiple titles. A practical example was an article on Westminster parking being carried in titles as far away as Scotland. The question we left you with was whether duplicate references should be left in or stripped out?  Having spoken to a number of people on this the consensus seems to be to leave them in – the argument being that people outside of your area are still being exposed to news about you and therefore these references should not be discounted.  Feel free to leave a comment if you feel strongly one way or another on this.

The chart below therefore shows traditional News sources continue to dominate, Twitter has dropped off a little, whereas Blogs have strengthened.

July Buzz Index media sources

July Buzz Index media sources

Last month we referenced the LGA’s New Reputation Guide – Continuing with the Reputation Management theme please take a look at Michael Douglas’s blog on IdeA Communities of Practice COP (its also published here in case you don’t have an IDeA log in) – discussing the potential impact of the ‘Community Pages’ facility in Facebook – and the opportunities and threats it poses to UK Councils.

Useful # Tags – if you’re new to twitter you may find some of the following useful to track – #localgov , #totalplace , #opendata , #cipr , #localgovweb etc.  I also recall TweetyHall were also proposing a list of #tags identifying Councils – Guys, has this progressed any further?

Finally, a date for your diaries – 23rd September 2010 – The LGC Public Sector Communications Forum in London has a packed programme discussing the challenges of managing comms in an environment of service cuts and reorganisation.



Notes.

Images and chart data may be used provided CouncilMonitor are credited accordingly.

For a more comprehensive service description please look at www.councilmonitor.com/about

Monthly Buzz Index methodology  – Details can be found here

About CouncilMonitor – CouncilMonitor trawls the Internet 24 hours a day, seven days a week, searching through news, blogs, forums and social media sites. It reads through all of this information and summarises what’s being said about UK councils, and can even tell you whether the sentiment is positive or negative (similar to the election worm we have seen at #leadersdebate). The service was launched in December 2009 so is still quite early on, but by measuring a benchmark group of councils on a consistent basis we hope to be able to provide some national trend information relating to what people are saying about their councils – and how they choose to say it.

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