UK Councils Social Media Reputation Index for October 2011

November 23, 2011 Leave a comment

This month:

  • The top 20 UK councils for new online buzz
  • Spotlights stories:
    • City of London Corporation: The protest outside St Paul’s
    • Northampton Borough Council: Nightclub tragedy and resignation of council Leader
    • Hastings Borough Council: Row over BNP speech in village hall
    • Buzz and Media Mix – News v Blogs v Twitter etc

The Top 20

This month we have made some changes to the Top 20. Rather than focussing on sentiment, we are going to be looking at the councils that have seen the biggest increases in the volume of online buzz they are attracting. The biggest movers (subject to them attaining a minimum number of references during the month – Districts = 100 mentions, Counties and Unitaries = 300) for this month are:

Top 20

Top 20

Spotlight stories

Now let’s take a look at the top three stories behind the buzz…

City of London Corporation: The protest outside St Paul’s

london graph

london graph

Graph showing City of London Corporation social media mentions during October, peaking on 28th October with the announcement of legal action to evict protestors

On the 15th October, 3,000 people protesting against economic inequality and corporate greed gathered in the square outside the London Stock Exchange, near St Paul’s Cathedral, with the aim of occupying it. Police prevented that from happening.

The Occupy London Stock Exchange (OLSX) protesters then turned to St Paul’s Churchyard, the square in front of the cathedral, planning to set up camp. By the third day, more than 100 tents were set up.

On the 28th October, St Paul’s Cathedral and the City of London Corporation decided to take legal action to evict the protesters, and it was this decision that led to a frenzy of activity on social media networks, and Twitter in particular.

Many were supportive of the action…                       … while others were siding with the protestors

london pos neg tweets

london pos neg tweets

It was good to see that the City of London Corporation actively engaged in the dialogue by replying to individual Tweets in an attempt to correct misinformation and misunderstanding, and to direct users to official statements.

london tweet responses

london tweet responses

Northampton Borough Council: Nightclub tragedy and resignation of council Leader

Two separate stories Bought Northampton Borough Council into the social media spotlight this month. The first was the tragic events in a city centre nightclub on the 19th October, in which two people died and which have led Northampton Borough Council to temporarily suspend the nightclub’s licence while an investigation takes place.

The second was the surprise resignation of Leader David Palethorpe just a week later – made all the more dramatic by the fact that it was announced via Twitter.

northampton leader tweet

northampton leader tweet

His announcement was quickly retweeted by BBC Northampton, and followed by a Tweet from the Labour camp…

Npton_Labour Cllr Mason [Labour leader Councillor Lee Mason] shocked at resignation saying the Tories are clearly divided and fighting each other like rats in a sack.

A couple of days later, Nprton_Labour made the following observation:

Npton_Labour Seriously I’m finding the use of twitter amongst Npton political establishment has surged in the last few days.

Hardly surprising, when it has become the communication channel of choice for political breaking news!


Hastings Borough Council: Row over BNP speech in village hall

Hastings Borough Council attracted media attention in October when it threatened to cancel a village hall’s rate subsidy if hosted a speech by BNP leader Nick Griffin. Hastings Borough Council said it was “contrary to the interests of the community” and councillors voted to withdraw the hall’s rate relief. The Leader of the labour-run council, Jeremy Birch, said: “I can’t agree that Hastings people should be subsidising a charity that’s prepared to provide a platform to someone who is so completely opposed to the community harmony philosophy of this local authority.”

The BNP responded by accusing the authority of blocking free speech, and this view was echoed by many in social media networks. The meeting was subsequently moved elsewhere.

hastings village hall

hastings village hall

BNP supporters leapt on the story, accusing Hastings Borough Council of obstructing free speech

Buzz and Media Mix

Next, this month’s total references to ‘Councils’ online is:

total council buzz

total council buzz

Looking back over the past 12 months, it is interesting to note that the overall volume of buzz is now relatively flat month-on-month, indicating that social media usage has reached a plateau, for now at least. This month, a new study by the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth found that for first time in the past 4 years there is virtually no change in Fortune 500 companies adopting Facebook, Twitter or Blogging.

Could this be a reflection that most of us have each reached our own personal plateau, and we have each come as far with social media as we are likely to come until the “next big thing”?

media mix

media mix

This plateau is reflected in all of the different sources.


Notes

PublicServiceMonitor images and chart data may be used provided PublicServiceMonitor is credited accordingly.

For a more comprehensive service description please look at www.publicservicemonitor.com/about

Monthly Buzz Index methodology – Details can be found here

About PublicServiceMonitor – PublicServiceMonitor trawls the Internet 24 hours a day, seven days a week, searching through news, blogs, forums and social media sites. It reads through all of this information and summarises what’s being said about UK councils, and can even tell you whether the sentiment is positive or negative (similar to the election worm we have seen at #leadersdebate). The service was launched in December 2009 so is still quite early on, but by measuring a benchmark group of councils on a consistent basis we hope to be able to provide some national trend information relating to what people are saying about their councils – and how they choose to say it.

Categories: Uncategorized

Welcome to the review of GovMetric data for August 2011.

October 24, 2011 Leave a comment

This index is based on aggregated data from 70 UK councils, gathered monthly through www.govmetric.com.

This month:

  • Monthly Spotlight  – Highest multi-channel satisfaction scores
  • Monthly Spotlight  – Highest per channel satisfaction scores
  • Spotlight: GovMetric Awards 2011 Winners Announcement
  • UK Councils -  Channel Access Ratios
  • UK Councils – Highest volume service demand
  • Methodology for Monthly Spotlights

Monthly Spotlights 

The first table looks at overall satisfaction on a multi-channel basis:

CAI Aug 2011 - All

CAI Aug 2011 - All

Well done to North Kesteven District Council, who take the top spot this month despite not appearing in last month’s top 10.

The second table looks at customer satisfaction with the Face to Face channel:

CAI Aug 2011 - F2F

CAI Aug 2011 - F2F


South Northamptonshire, Mid Devon and East Hertfordshire all appear in this month’s index.  


 The third table looks at customer satisfaction with the telephone channel:

CAI Aug 2011 - Tel

CAI Aug 2011 - Tel

Dundee City Council is the highest new entrant this month.


The fourth table looks at customer satisfaction with the web channel:

CAI Aug 2011 - Web

CAI Aug 2011 - Web


Well done to North Hertfordshire District Council – a great performance.

Finally, this chart looks at the number of Feedback gathered:

CAI Aug 2011 - feedback volume

CAI Aug 2011 - feedback volume

The positions of the top six performers are all unchanged this month, with well over 20,000 pieces of feedback between them in just a month. That really is a huge amount of insight!

 

Spotlight

GovMetric Awards 2011 Winners Announcement

We are very pleased to announce the winners of this year’s GovMetric Awards. Many thanks to all of you who made submissions, we were all very encouraged by the fantastic work our subscribers are doing to engage with customers and use their feedback to bring about real change- both in the way services are provided and on improving the culture and strategy of their organisations.

Council of the Year (Unitary/ County) – London Borough of Sutton
Sutton have had an incredible year, spurred on by their gong last year they have gone from strength to strength. Again they have collected a staggering amount of customer feedback – over 94,000 individual ratings across the three main channels. Using their customer feedback in a variety of ways Sutton have been able to demonstrate the real value of customer insight in making improvements and they have learnt hard lessons from their customers by effectively using  the service to monitor issues having a strong impact on the customer experience. They now have a strong commitment to really listening to the voice of the customer.

Council of the Year (District) – Stevenage Borough Council
We know that smaller organisations are different from large ones and they work in different ways, this is why we decided to open up our ‘Council of Year’ category and recognise the great work that some of the smaller borough and district councils are doing. Stevenage Borough Council have collected over 23000 feedback responses which is amazing given the population of the borough is under 80000. Stevenage are prolific across all of the three main channels and are relentless in striving for customer satisfaction. They know that you need to measure satisfaction consistently to better understand your customers. They have regularly appeared in our top ten in our Customer Access Index, and continually obtain excellent ratings from their customers.

Council Website of the Year – Warwickshire County Council
Having been in our top 5 for satisfaction in almost every month since we started publishing our Customer Access Index, and hitting number one on several occasions, Warwickshire are worthy winners of our Council Website of the Year. They have received more feedback on this channel than any other council and they have used the feedback constructively to fine tune their new website. They know that making little changes on the web and continually looking to make improvements, for which customer input is a huge feature, is the key to success. They value both the quantitative and qualitative feedback they receive through GovMetric and this is really driving their plans for the future.

Service Category Excellence – Hinckley & Bosworth Borough Council for Council Tax Service
This year we decided to look at results based on the basic GovMetric service categories to see if we could recognise some excellent practices in a particular service area. This was a tough challenge as we needed to prove consistency as well as overall excellence. Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council were our ultimate winners for their excellent customer ratings in the Council Tax category. Most of their feedback came from the face to face and telephone channels, so we know that the staff do a fantastic job and that the council provides a quick, informative service to its customers.  Achieving an overall satisfaction figure of 94% which was an increase of almost 3 points on last year, they also managed to increase the feedback levels by over 4% too. Consistent, measurable improvement – just what we like to see!

Case Studies in Excellence – The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea and Southend-On-Sea Borough Council
Both of these councils continue year on year to improve their use of GovMetric and make progress with the overall customer insight agenda.

We were really impressed with the staff engagement work that Southend-On-Sea Borough Council have been doing, they actively educate and brief their staff in the importance of collecting customer insight, continuously measure individual staff involvement and have integrated this into their formal appraisal processes. Most importantly we can see that staff have better visibility of the entire insight process, from collection, to analysis and accountability for responding to feedback.

At The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea GovMetric has become well embedded in their operations, and they have worked hard on incorporating customer insight into their KPIs and the organisation’s “vital signs”.  Add to this further improvements in staff training and mentoring, making better use of data and analysis of comments, and progressive feedback throughout the organisation, RBKC are definitely getting it right!

GovMetric Team of the Year – Dundee City Council
Dundee City Council have been using Govmetric for over a year. They had a slow start but they know how important it is to be listening to customers. They now have a structured approach to monitoring take up and have empowered the staff to use the techniques that work for them when engaging with customers. This has resulted in much more useful data and some great responses from customers about the staff themselves. We recognise that the team at Dundee have put in a lot of hard work this year to really embed GovMetric into their everyday responsibilities.

We had many submissions for this category and it was a hard choice for us to make, indeed all teams are to be congratulated for their efforts. There were a couple of submission that stood out for us for which we would like to mention and award a runner up prize, they are

Runner Up – The Borough of King’s Lynn & West Norfolk
Runner Up – Wigan Metropolitan Borough Council

Both of these teams have been through significant changes in the last year but we were impressed with their commitment to the customer and the team spirit that has prevailed!

GovMetric Promotion Award – The Royal Borough of Windsor & Maidenhead
We are always on the look out for ideas for promoting GovMetric. Raising awareness, communicating key messages to customers and generally encouraging them to participate is vital on all channels, but on the face to face and web channels we have an opportunity to do this through a visual means.  Signposting and clearly explaining to customers the importance of their feedback and how you use it can easily be done through articles, posters, signs and displays. Earlier this year The Royal Borough of Windsor & Maidenhead created a presentation which is shown on their LCD screen their Customer Service Centre. The presentation is simple but very effective, and shows video footage of customers giving feedback and reinforces the importance of customers telling us what they think. Along with some other promotional work RBWM have significantly increased the number of responses they receive on the face-to-face channel.

Finally, thanks to Colchester Council who kindly hosted the East Region User Group this month.  It was a really enjoyable and valuable day, with a jam-packed agenda.

UK Councils – Channel Access Ratios & Highest volume service demand

This is where we take a look at the two key charts from the national trends data – channel ratios and service volume trends for UK councils in the sample.

CAI Aug 2011 - channel chart

CAI Aug 2011 - channel chart

CAI Aug 2011 - services chart

CAI Aug 2011 - services chart

Methodology for Monthly Spotlights

The monthly spotlights are calculated using aggregated data from 70 UK councils. The methodology is as follows:

Overall satisfaction is based on GovMetric councils which have achieved the required total number of feedbacks across a minimum of 2 channels:

  • County – min of 800 feedbacks for the month
  • Unitary – min of 800 feedbacks for the month
  • District – min of 400 feedbacks for the month

Channel satisfaction is based on GovMetric councils which have achieved the required number of channel feedbacks across a minimum of 1 channel:

  • County – min of 400 feedbacks for the month
  • Unitary – min of 400 feedbacks for the month
  • District – min of 200 feedbacks for the month

Notes

Populations circa 2009.
The arrows indicate the council’s position on the chart compared to the previous month’s results.

Data is sourced from www.govmetric.com. GovMetric is a customer experience measurement service that enables you to listen to the Voice of the Customer across all contact channels, to prioritise which areas to improve and to measure improvements through near real-time reporting.

As the data used is a fixed snapshot taken at the end of each month there may be minor variances to the data seen in GovMetric reporting due to final data updates after the end of the month, mapping updates etc.

For a demo of how GovMetric works please visit http://www.govmetric.com/demo.  Make sure you have volume turned on!

Categories: Uncategorized

UK Councils Social Media Reputation Index for September 2011

October 24, 2011 Leave a comment

This month:

  • The top 20 UK councils for online reputation
  • Caught in the fray – Basildon Council and #dalefarm debate
  • Twitter Top Tip – @reply vs. direct message
  • After the riots
  • The Media Mix – News v Blogs v Twitter etc

The Top 20

The top 20 councils ranked by social media sentiment (subject to them attaining a minimum number of references during the month – Districts = 100 mentions, Counties and Unitaries = 300) for this month are:

top 20

top 20

Gloucester City Council and Sutton Council, who have both appeared before in the Top 20, reach the top of the sentiment chart this month.

 

Spotlight

The single biggest story in social media this month was without a doubt the clearance of Dale Farm by Basildon Council. The six-acre plot of land in the village of Crays Hill has been used as an unauthorised traveller site since 2001. In July 2011, Basildon Council issued a notice to the travellers to vacate the site, and the weeks that followed the travellers fought back.

The arguments on both sides are not new – angry residents complain illegal camping, damage and disruption, while travelling families complain they’re continually moved on by police and bailiffs and subject to constant prejudice. The strength of feeling involved on both sides has inevitably led to an explosion in social media buzz.

The story peaked on 19th September when the scheduled clearance was halted by a last minute injunction.  The day’s events saw Basildon Council ‘trending’ on Twitter for nearly 8 hours – in itself extremely unusual for a council.

peak

peak

There was a huge spike in online buzz for Basildon Council on 19th September

However, this was dwarfed by the #dalefarm hashtag that has been adopted by Twitter users on both sides of the battle, and which has been used to express extreme views that many commentators say have crossed over into outright racism. This places Basidon Council in a difficult position – how to use social media to inform citizens about events at Dale Farm, and to educate people about the Council’s legal duties, without being dragged into a dirty debate?

Basidon Council has responded by broadcasting frequent updates on its website, facebook page and via Twitter, but it appears to have steadfastly refused to enter into any kind of dialogue in these spaces. This seems to be a pragmatic approach in sensitive circumstances.

basildon facebook

basildon facebook

Basildon Council has chosen not to respond to Twitter and Facebook messages

It would be wise to remember that a big story like this one will shine the social media spotlight into other corners of your online presence that otherwise might have gone undiscovered. We won’t name any names, but in researching this story we came across tweets from individuals associated with the Council that we cannot imagine were ever intended for public consumption.

Top tip:

Make sure that your officers and Members understand the difference between an @reply and a direct message. Although they are directed at a specific user, @replies are PUBLIC and will appear on the twitter timeline for all to see! If you want to say something privately on Twitter, you MUST use a direct message.

To finish… this is the last Reputation Index to be published under the CouncilMonitor brand! In response to growing demand, we are broadening the scope of our reputation management solution to include all public services, not just local government. So this month it seems appropriate to take a quick look at a story from the wider public sector – in this case, the police.

LGC reports that an independent review of the riots in Wandsworth that saw unchecked lawlessness in Clapham Junction has called on the police to review its use of social media after officers ignored warnings that the area would be a flashpoint.

You can read the full story here: http://www.lgcplus.com/briefings/joint-working/community-safety/riot-review-calls-for-new-social-media-procedures/5035917.article


Buzz and Media Mix

Next, this month’s total references to ‘Councils’ online is:

Total Council Buzz

Total Council Buzz

September has seen a continued recovery in online buzz. Let’s look at the media mix for more information:

Media Mix Sept 11

Media Mix Sept 11

Twitter usage continues to grow – just look at how it has roughly trebled its share since this time time last year.


Notes

CouncilMonitor images and chart data may be used provided CouncilMonitor are credited accordingly.

For a more comprehensive service description please look at www.councilmonitor.com/about

Monthly Buzz Index methodology – Details can be found here

About CouncilMonitor – CouncilMonitor trawls the Internet 24 hours a day, seven days a week, searching through news, blogs, forums and social media sites. It reads through all of this information and summarises what’s being said about UK councils, and can even tell you whether the sentiment is positive or negative (similar to the election worm we have seen at #leadersdebate). The service was launched in December 2009 so is still quite early on, but by measuring a benchmark group of councils on a consistent basis we hope to be able to provide some national trend information relating to what people are saying about their councils – and how they choose to say it.

Categories: Uncategorized

UK Councils – Customer Access Index July 2011

September 29, 2011 Leave a comment

Welcome to the review of GovMetric data for July 2011.

This index is based on aggregated data from 70 UK councils, gathered monthly through www.govmetric.com.

This month:

  • Monthly Spotlight  – Highest multi-channel satisfaction scores
  • Monthly Spotlight  – Highest per channel satisfaction scores
  • Spotlight: A look at the LGC / Serco channel shift survey
  • UK Councils -  Channel Access Ratios
  • UK Councils – Highest volume service demand
  • Methodology for Monthly Spotlights

Monthly Spotlights 

The first table looks at overall satisfaction on a multi-channel basis:

CAI July 2011 - All

CAI July 2011 - All

Essex County Council is a new entry into the overall top ten. The top three councils remain unchanged.

The second table looks at customer satisfaction with the Face to Face channel:

CAI July 2011 - F2F

CAI July 2011 - F2F


Harborough District Council and Southend-on-Sea Borough Council are new entries in the index.

The third table looks at customer satisfaction with the telephone channel:

CAI July 2011 - Tel

CAI July 2011 - Tel

It’s all change this month, with six new entrants in the table. Lincolnshire County Council maintains its position at the top of the index.


The fourth table looks at customer satisfaction with the web channel:

CAI July 2011 - Web

CAI July 2011 - Web

There are several new entries this month, with Kensington and Chelsea placed as the highest new entrant.

Finally, this chart looks at the number of Feedback gathered:

CAI July 2011 - Feedback volume

CAI July 2011 - Feedback volume

Southend-on-Sea and Waltham Forest Councils have made a new entry in the index, and The London Borough of Sutton has maintained the top position with nearly 6000 pieces of feedback this month.

 

Spotlight

Last week LGC featured an interesting article on channel shift, examining councils’ progress in shifting channels and the obstacles they still come up against. For those of you who missed it, the report (based on a survey carried out by LGC and Serco during August) included some interesting findings.

The survey found that when it comes to how councils contact their service users, email is only marginally more popular than ‘snail mail’, with only 28% of survey respondents citing it as a one of their primary contact methods (compared to 24% for regular mail). When you compare this to the dominance of email in our own office communications, this result is startling, and certainly prompts the question “why?”. Furthermore, the survey found very little evidence of channel shift to social media and mobile – channels that have been transforming the customer contact in the private sector.

The growth in internet and mobile take up means that demand for these services cannot be far away; councils risk missing significant opportunities for reducing costs and improving customer access if they do not take these channel shift opportunities seriously, the report concludes.

Understanding how well you deliver services by email is obviously crucial to improving customer uptake. You may not be aware that GovMetric can be used to measure customer satisfaction with emails, as well as the main three channels. If you are already a GovMetric user but are not yet using our email solution, why not give us a call to find out how it could help you?

UK Councils – Channel Access Ratios & Highest volume service demand

This is where we take a look at the two key charts from the national trends data – channel ratios and service volume trends for UK councils in the sample.

CAI July 2011 - Channels chart

CAI July 2011 - Channels chart

Methodology for Monthly Spotlights

The monthly spotlights are calculated using aggregated data from 70 UK councils. The methodology is as follows:

Overall satisfaction is based on GovMetric councils which have achieved the required total number of feedbacks across a minimum of 2 channels:

  • County – min of 800 feedbacks for the month
  • Unitary – min of 800 feedbacks for the month
  • District – min of 400 feedbacks for the month

Channel satisfaction is based on GovMetric councils which have achieved the required number of channel feedbacks across a minimum of 1 channel:

  • County – min of 400 feedbacks for the month
  • Unitary – min of 400 feedbacks for the month
  • District – min of 200 feedbacks for the month

Notes

Populations circa 2009.
The arrows indicate the council’s position on the chart compared to the previous month’s results.

Data is sourced from www.govmetric.com. GovMetric is a customer experience measurement service that enables you to listen to the Voice of the Customer across all contact channels, to prioritise which areas to improve and to measure improvements through near real-time reporting.

As the data used is a fixed snapshot taken at the end of each month there may be minor variances to the data seen in GovMetric reporting due to final data updates after the end of the month, mapping updates etc.

For a demo of how GovMetric works please visit http://www.govmetric.com/demo.  Make sure you have volume turned on!



Categories: Uncategorized

UK Councils – Customer Access Index May & June 2011

Based on aggregated data from 70 UK councils, gathered monthly through www.GovMetric.com

This month:

  • Monthly Spotlights  – Highest multichannel satisfaction scores
  • Monthly Spotlights  – Highest per channel satisfaction scores
  • Find out where you rank amongst other Councils with our satisfaction tier chart
  • Spotlight:
  • UK Councils -  Channel Access Ratios
  • UK Councils – Highest volume service demand
  • Methodology for Monthly Spotlights

Welcome to the review of GovMetric data, this month we are looking at both  May & June 2011.

Monthly Spotlights 

The first table looks at overall satisfaction on a multi channel basis.

Overall may

Overall may

Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council and Wychavon are new entries into the overall top ten. The three top performers remain in their positions.

overall jun

overall jun

South Northamptonshire Council and Shropshire Council are new entries and Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council have moved up three places in the index.


The second table looks at customer satisfaction with the face 2 face channel:

f2f may

f2f may

North Kesteven District Council, Rugby Borough Council & South Northamptonshire Council are new entries and have ranked high in the index.

f2f jun

f2f jun

For the first time, this index contains all of the same councils as last month. Do we have a leading group emerging perhaps? We will have a look when we assess July’s data.

The third table looks at customer satisfaction with the telephone channel:

 

Tel may

Tel may


Wychavon District Council and South Tyneside Metropolitan Borough Council have made an entry into the top ten, a fantastic achievement in this channel.

Tel jun

Tel jun

Charnwood Borough Council, Southend-on-Sea Borough Council and North Hertfordshire District Council have all entered the chart this month. Lincolnshire County Council and Borough Council of King’s Lynn and West Norfolk maintain their position at the top of the index.

The fourth table looks at customer satisfaction with the web channel.

Web may

Web may

 

South Tyneside Metropolitan Borough Council, North Hertfordshire District Council and Stevenage Borough Council have all entered the chart this month. Congratulations to South Tyneside for going straight to the top spot!

web jun

web jun

Croydon Council, Hambleton District Council and Leicestershire County Council are new entries into the index this month.

 

Spotlight: The Royal Borough of Windsor & Maidenhead’s innovative promotion of GovMetric

We love seeing the different ways that our customers promote GovMetric to their own customers. Take a look at The Royal Borough of Windsor & Maidenhead’s video below for some inspiration :Link to video

UK Councils – Channel Access Ratios & Highest volume service demand

This is where we take a look at the 2 key charts from the national trends data – channel ratios and service volume trends for UK councils in the sample.

May:

access channels may

access channels may

The other chart we look at regularly is demand by service type.

Key services may

Key services may

June:

access channels jun

access channels jun

key services jun

key services jun

 

 

 

 

Methodology for Monthly Spotlights

The monthly spotlights are calculated using aggregated data from 70 UK councils. The proposed methodology is this.

Highest multichannel satisfaction scores

To work out the overall satisfaction then include GovMetric councils which have achieved the required total number of feedbacks across a minimum of 2 channels

  • County – min of 800 feedbacks for the month
  • Unitary – min of 800 feedbacks for the month
  • District – min of 400 feedbacks for the month

To work out the channel by channel satisfaction include GovMetric councils which have achieved the required number of channel feedbacks across a minimum of 1 channel

  • County – min of 400 feedbacks for the month
  • Unitary – min of 400 feedbacks for the month
  • District – min of 200 feedbacks for the month

Notes

Populations circa 2009.
The arrows indicate the council’s position on the chart compared to the previous month’s results.

Data is sourced from www.govmetric.com. GovMetric is a customer experience measurement service that enables you to listen to the Voice of the Customer across all contact channels, to prioritise which areas to improve and to measure improvements through near real-time reporting.

As the data used is a fixed snapshot taken at the end of each month there may be minor variances to the data seen in GovMetric reporting due to final data updates after the end of the month, mapping updates etc.

For a demo of how GovMetric works please visit http://www.govmetric.com/demo .  Make sure you have volume turned on!

Categories: Uncategorized

UK Councils Social Media Reputation Index for July 2011

This month:

  • The top 20 UK councils for online reputation
  • Have you got a Social Media Policy?
  • The Media Mix – News v Blogs v Twitter etc

The Top 20

The top 20 councils ranked by social media sentiment (subject to them attaining a minimum number of references during the month – Districts = 100 mentions, Counties and Unitaries = 300) for this month are:

Top 20

Top 20

This month’s Top 20 is a good example of how you can have a successful online presence no matter what your size. Let’s look at Wyre Forest District Council & Essex County Council and how they approach their online activities.

Wyre Forest District Council have small but well managed Facebook and Twitter accounts. Their website is unusual compared to our other top performers as it does not promote their social media heavily. However it is a very informative, organised site and shows that their focus on informing customers on the web is a priority.

Wyre Forest

Wyre Forest

Essex County Council’s website features links to their social media accounts on their home page & it manages these accounts well so that they are able to achieve the score that they do with the high volume of mentions they receive.

Essex

Essex

Have you got a social media policy for employees?

More and more public sector organisations are developing a social media policy as part of their reputation management activity. The British Medical Association’s recent steps to warn medics of the impact of including references to their professional life in their private social networking is one such instance.  Monitoring mentions of your organisation is one way that can help your organisation know what is being said. A policy is another, do you have one?

SM policy

SM policy

Buzz and Media Mix

Next, this month’s total references to ‘Councils’ online is:

Council Buzz

Council Buzz

July has brought a recent dip in online buzz. Let’s look at the media mix for more information:

Media Mix

Media Mix

We can see that with the exception of the news channel, the other forms of media have reduced in the last month. Could this be as a result of summer holiday season? We shall see what August’s results bring.

 

 

 

Notes.

Images and chart data may be used provided CouncilMonitor are credited accordingly.

For a more comprehensive service description please look at www.councilmonitor.com/about

Monthly Buzz Index methodology  – Details can be found here

About CouncilMonitor – CouncilMonitor trawls the Internet 24 hours a day, seven days a week, searching through news, blogs, forums and social media sites. It reads through all of this information and summarises what’s being said about UK councils, and can even tell you whether the sentiment is positive or negative (similar to the election worm we have seen at #leadersdebate). The service was launched in December 2009 so is still quite early on, but by measuring a benchmark group of councils on a consistent basis we hope to be able to provide some national trend information relating to what people are saying about their councils – and how they choose to say it.

Categories: Uncategorized

UK Councils Social Media Reputation Index for June 2011

This month:

  • The top 20 UK councils for online reputation
  • The Media Mix – News v Blogs v Twitter etc
  • Public Sector’s use of social media advancing
  • Managing Impersonators

The Top 20

The top 20 councils ranked by social media sentiment (subject to them attaining a minimum number of references during the month – Districts = 100 mentions, Counties and Unitaries = 300) for this month are:

Top 20

Top 20

Congratulations to Southwark Council for achieving such a high score in the Top 20. A quick look online shows they have a commitment to social media communications, with clear signposting on their website and a good audience on the platforms managed by an e-communications team.

Southwark

Southwark

Public Sector’s use of social media advancing:

We have seen examples of public sector organisations using Twitter to raise awareness of what they do. Surrey Police have developed this further by reporting every car crime in a one-week period on Twitter. This is an excellent example of using Twitter for a two-way dialogue. It is hoped that Twitter users can actually help the Police with their investigations. There must be many more scenarios where a process like this could lead to service efficiencies?

Surrey Police

Surrey Police

Managing Impersonators:

The issue of controlling Twitter looks set to become more and more pressing, with the example below being another consideration that councils will need to take.  Many Twitter users coming across the username of @DMBC_LEADER would reasonably assume that this person is related to Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council, and may even follow this person’s tweets or accept a follower request. However, one quick glance on this Twitter user’s page and we can see that this is not something that any council would want to have associated with them. Yet this person is using the council’s logo and brand.  Currently there is very little power to act on impersonators like this. Being aware that they are around and monitoring what they are saying is a start though.

Impersonators

Impersonators

Buzz and Media Mix

Next, this month’s total references to ‘Councils’ online is:

Council Buzz June 2011

Council Buzz June 2011

We can see a recent increase in total online buzz. Knowing that news syndication measurement changes account for the apparent dip in total buzz (see earlier blogs for more on this), let’s look at the media mix to understand more on what has contributed to this lift:

Media Mix June 2011

Media Mix June 2011

Twitter’s return to previous levels indicates that May, the month of the elections, provided a peak in this particular channel. This could suggest that a pattern to council and resident usage of the social media channels. For example, Twitter’s speed being effective for spreading election news and reaction. Online news has shown a further increase from last month. Council mentions on blogs have reduced in the last few months. We shall continue to watch this.

Notes.

Images and chart data may be used provided CouncilMonitor are credited accordingly.

For a more comprehensive service description please look at www.councilmonitor.com/about

Monthly Buzz Index methodology  – Details can be found here

About CouncilMonitor – CouncilMonitor trawls the Internet 24 hours a day, seven days a week, searching through news, blogs, forums and social media sites. It reads through all of this information and summarises what’s being said about UK councils, and can even tell you whether the sentiment is positive or negative (similar to the election worm we have seen at #leadersdebate). The service was launched in December 2009 so is still quite early on, but by measuring a benchmark group of councils on a consistent basis we hope to be able to provide some national trend information relating to what people are saying about their councils – and how they choose to say it.

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